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Hansen first tests marble patterns by creating individual paper prints. Unless noted, photos courtesy of Pernille Snedker Hansen

 

Various marble patterns combine to create a unique floor. Photo by Stamers Kontor

Against the Grain

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

by Stephen Killion

Talk about a blast from the past. Pernille Snedker Hansen, founder of Copenhagen's snedker°studio, has found a new use for Suminagashi, a centuries-old East Asian method of marbling. “Marbling fascinates me because it is very organic and a bit [of an] uncontrollable process," Hansen says.

To transform lackluster pine plinths into her uniquely trippy Marbelous Wood planks, Hansen stains each wood panel by hand. But prior to doing so, she develops patterns though experimental paper and ink prints. “I aim to create patterns where you are drawn into the colors and details. From a distance they might seem more orderly, but when you get closer you see the many colors that are embedded within the fine lines and details,” the designer explains.

Not planning on redoing your floor in the near future? Well, you are in luck: Hansen offers her patterns, artifacts of the design process, for purchase through her studio. Sleek Scandinavian blacks lights not included.