Exhibition | Against the Grain at MAD New York - Design Bureau

MAD_Ai Weiwei_EXHIBTION_Grapes_lrg

Grapes, 2008. Ai Weiwei; Ten Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) stools. Courtesy of the artist; Friedman Benda, New York; Photo: Bill Orcutt

MAD_Bruun, Nina_EXHIBITION_NEST_5

Nest, 2010. Nina Bruun; Birch, textile, foam Courtesy of the artist; Photo: Adam Dyrvig Tatt

MAD_Errazuriz, Sebastian_EXHIBITION Porcupine 1Porcupine Cabinet, 2011. Sebastian Errazuriz; Lacquered wood, steel, glass; Edition of 12. Courtesy of Cristina Grajales Gallery, New York Photo: Courtesy of Cristina Grajales Gallery, New York

MAD_Kurtz, Christopher_EXHIBITION_A Typical

A(typical) Windsor Form, 2004. Christopher Kurtz; Steam bent ash, white oak, pine, milk paint. Courtesy of Tomlinson Kong Contemporary, New York; Photo: Christopher Kurtz

Spiral Impact 3

Hyperboloid 3, 2007. Bud Latven; Macassar ebony, Brazilian canarywood. Courtesy of the artist; Photo: Robert Reck

Exhibition | Against the Grain at MAD New York

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

Woodworking has been a staple practice in design since they first invented the tree. And no we’re not talking about those pine squirrels gramps used to whittle or that totally awesome jewelry box you made in 8th-grade shop class. Through September 15, the Museum of Arts and Design in New York hosts Against the Grain, an exhibition of nearly 90 21st-century works of wood design from the likes of Ai Weiwei, Sarah Oppenheimer, Sebastian Errazuriz, Maarten Baas, and Marc Andre Robinson.

Part of the museum’s ongoing “Materials & Process” series, the exhibit explores the conceptual and technical trends in designing with wood. “Wood is a ubiquitous material and a medium of basic function as well as tremendous versatility. In the last several decades, artists have truly begun to test its creative boundaries, expressing and expanding wood’s aesthetic and conceptual possibilities,” says curator Lowery Stokes Sims. “The artists featured in Against the Grain represent the forward-thinking approach that has spurred the medium’s renaissance.” 

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