Above: Tai Ping Chroma Collection

Modern Interior

Modern interior.

 Above: Black Crow Studios by Brenda Houston

blots bottom indigo 8x10 copy

small white penthouse copy

Above: Zoe Luyendijk Studios

Free From the Frame

Friday, May 9th, 2014

Images courtesy of Tai Ping, Black Crow Studios, Atelier Lapchi 

These artists take abstract patterns and transform them into gallery-worthy accents for the home.

Tai Ping Chroma Collection 

Neutral-colored rugs provide a blank canvas for splotches and splatterings of color in the newest collection from international woven carpet manufacturer Tai Ping. Aptly titled the Chroma Collection, the series features 15 unique designs made in combinations of wool, silk, and flax.

Finding ways to translate visual strokes of “paint” to textiles made this project one of the most significant collections that global design director Yasmina Benazzou has created for Tai Ping. Inspired by the various hand movements used during painting, the rug designs explore both free and controlled gestures. The Phenomena I mimics a dry-brush effect (where the texture and color move horizontally across the canvas), and others like Immersion I and Progression I emulate a dip-dye effect, as if the rug were dipped into a pool of color. Each one is unique and unpredictable.

Black Crow wallpaper featuring Brenda Houston

Inspired by the inherent texture and nuance found in minerals, stones, and jewels, designer Brenda Houston usually focuses on making tables and accessories with her naturally sourced materials. While collaborating with custom wallpaper-design company Black Crow Studios, Houston selected photos of her favorite minerals for Tracy Hiner from Black Crow to transform into large-scale wallpaper, each one custom made to fit the intended order.

“Black Crow Studios is known for doing large- scale murals that, while colorful, are still very organic in feeling,” Hiner says. “I believe that is why working with Brenda makes so much sense for us. Brenda Houston for Black Crow Studios takes both of our strengths to develop a stunning series of designs that we think people will really respond to.”

Atelier Lapchi featuring Zoë Luyendik Studio 

Zoë Luyendijk doesn’t consider herself an artist, but one look at her designs reveals an uncommon and imaginative vision. A former interior designer, Luyendijk builds schemes from a wide array of inspirations—free from the confines of conventional rug design—including colors, places, moments, photography, collages, and sketches.

The eclectic Zoë collection landed at the Atelier Lapchi showroom in Chicago’s Merchandise Mart earlier this spring. Showroom director Nathan Tucker agrees that Luyendijk’s work is more than simply good design. “So much thought and effort went into getting her concept realized into a difficult craft medium like a Tibetan rug,” he says. “With that in mind, it’s truly visionary what she accomplishes in her creations.”

In order to translate her work from concept to final product, Luyendijk searched ruthlessly for the perfect overseas mill to produce the carpets—one that would execute her vision technically while also supporting fair wages and working conditions. She now works closely with a unit in Kathmandu that is part of the GoodWeave certification program, which works to end child labor in the carpet industry.

Each carpet is made to order from Tibetan wool, silk, hemp, linen, or cotton and can be woven in a range of sizes.

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