Architecture of the Mind - Design Bureau

Sanne Jansen

Sanne Jansen

Sanne Jansen

Sanne Jansen

Architecture of the Mind

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Sanne Jansen’s latest collection, ‘Architecture of the Mind,’ manages to play with graphic form and sex appeal without being too frivolous or unwearable. Jansen’s subtle color palette includes navy, gray, pumpkin, dusty rose and black.  A three-quarter length, straight-leg gray pantsuit is punctuated with ruffles along the shoulders that meet in a deep V at the back, while what could be a boring black miniskirt is made new with thick, voluminous vertical pleats.

As most designers would agree, attention to detail is what makes a truly exceptional collection, and Jansen’s Fall/Winter 2010 line ‘Architecture of the Mind’ is no exception. The merino wool cardigan is hand-woven, and Jansen says there are “details like little golden ribbons and golden slashes” included into some of the pieces. Her items  have a sculptural quality worth noting.  “I wanted to see in what way unusual shapes and volumes could be integrated in a garment without becoming over-designed.”

Born and based in the Netherlands, Jansen never dreamed of becoming a fashion designer.  Her mother made clothes for Jansen and her sister and she went to Academie St. Joost to study graphic design.  After a few months, she changed her mind and considered the possibility of taking up fine art, photography or fashion. In the end, she chose to focus on fashion design at Hogeschool Zuyd since it combined aspects of art, photography and textiles—all crafts that are visible in Jansen’s namesake line, from the collection itself to the unique set designs created for each collection’s photo shoot.

Jansen designs her simple, sculptural pieces for the kind of woman who is independent, self-confident and loves to wear high-quality clothing. Her collection is modern and sexy and she hopes that her clients will wear and appreciate her clothes for seasons to come.

“I like to celebrate simplicity and durability. I don’t create clothes that only last a season.”

 

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