Weathering the Elements - Design Bureau

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Jason Payne's Raspberry Fields

Weathering the Elements

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

Jason Payne, principal of Hirsuta and assistant professor of architecture at University of California, explains his shingled Utah creation

This project is a full renovation and restoration of an existing, one-room schoolhouse built in northern Utah in the early 1900s. The effects of weathering (or lack thereof) are captured in the shape, texture and color of the original wood cladding and shingles. While the structure’s southwest façade faces directly into prevailing winter storms and southerly solar exposure, the northeast side has remained nearly perfectly preserved.

In contrast to the formal-geometrical project of the interior, the design of the exterior addresses the affective material qualities of wood subjected to various degrees of weathering. Appearing relatively flat and monolithic upon completion, over time, this expression of natural weathering—coupled with an accelerated process brought about by intentionally improperly attached shingles—will encourage premature curling.

The undersides of the shingles on this side are stained much more brightly than the dark topsides, ranging in color from orange to purple to match the four colors of raspberry species indigenous to the site. Thus, when the shingles begin to curl, their undersides reveal a flamboyance that is in marked contrast to the darkened reserve of the initial skin.

Over many years, it is hoped that the shingles on the exposed side take on the character of fur, growing slightly fuller with each season. Meanwhile, the northeast side—the only façade subjected to local scrutiny due to the orientation of the building on the site—will remain reasonably straight and composed.

 

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